Add SSL support to podPress

podPress is a dead WordPress plugin that makes it easy to publish podcasts using WordPress, and I still use it on my podcast network, EasyPodcast. That is going to change once we deploy my own, custom built CMS, but I still have to use it for the time being.
podPress HTTPSThis week I switched everything to HTTPS, feeds and media delivery included, and podPress started having issue in detecting the episode mp3’s file size and duration when I provided either an http or https link to the file.

This is due to a couple issues: it wasn’t recognizing HTTPS URLs, since it had an hard-coded check to make sure they were served over HTTP (I can see the point: you wouldn’t want to serve podcasts over FTP). Once I patched this, the file size detection started working again (it just reads the content-length HTTP header).

I was still experiencing issues getting the mp3’s duration: to do so, podPress downloads the mp3 (with curl, since it’s available on my server) and analyzes it using the getID3 library. However, I found out that for some reason the download file had the HTTP headers prepended to its contents, so the library couldn’t properly parse the mp3. It was due to a curl option in the code that enables that behavior. Why that was added to podPress and why it wasn’t an issue over HTTP is beyond me.

The two changes I made are both in the podpress_admin_functions.php file, and involved lines 1028 (to allow SSL) and 1618 (to prevent HTTP headers from being written to the file).

Here’s the diff file.

Record multi-track Skype group call on OS X

A friend of mine and I host a weekly podcast and, as it often happens, we speak with our guests via Skype. For a while we had everyone record his own audio, since we wanted to have a separate track for each person in order to get the best possible audio quality. But that was inconvenient, both for our guest and for us, as we had to wait everyone to send us his audio before mixing and editing the episode. Recording Skype’s group call in a conventional way wasn’t a better solution. We’d only have two separate tracks: mine and everybody else’s, This is fine if there is only one person other than me, but it’s not with more guests.
So I started to think on possible solutions, and the best one that came to my mind was to have a separate instance of Skype running for each guest (I’ll explain how to do this later on) and use Ableton Live to record each track and to manage the audio routing.

Ableton Live is quite expensive, though, and if you don’t already have some experience with it that justifies purchasing a license, I’d advise you to check out snkl’s post that explains in detail how to achieve the same result with a much cheaper (but still great) app: Rogue Amoeba’s Audio Hijack 3.

My awesome hand-drawn scheme

My awesome hand-drawn scheme

To manage the audio, we need some sort of virtual audio cables to connect Skype to Ableton Live. The best tool is SoundFlower, so head over to their site, download and install it. However, it is not ready for our purpose right out of the box: we need 2 “virtual audio cables” for each Skype instance, and Soundflower only ships with 2 of them enabled by default (and only one of which, the 2 channel one, is suited for our needs). I managed to edit Soundflower’s plist file to get more.

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